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The Wealth of India

1925

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Summary

If the East thought more of the things of the spirit and of the life beyond in the past it was because the valleys of the Ganges and the Indus of the Euphrates and the Tigris were extraordinarily fertile and made the necessaries and comforts of life easily available to the people. [...] The complexity of the factors that determine the strength and distribution of the current makes it difficult to secure evenness and uniformity of behaviour on the part of the current with the result that there is scarcely a year in which some part of the vast continent does not suffer from failure of harvest. [...] The country is rich in fisheries whose vast potentialities have not yet been realised.22 THE WEALTH OF INDIA CHAP THE ENVIRONMENT MODIFIED BY MAN The material welfare of society depends not only on the gifts of nature but on the utilisation of these gifts uy men on the transformation of unfavourable surroundings and conditions into the conditions of a good life. [...] The variety of gauges the adotion of differentiating rates which favour the foreign exporter at the cost of even and rapid internal distribution the lack of uniformity and co-ordination are the most salient amongst the defects of railway administration in India. [...] The results of their observations are to be made the basis of expert advice as to the best mode of utilising those natural resources in the interests of the English trade.""it THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT 27 B. Climate Fro-m an economic point of view the unfavourable effects of adverse climatic conditions can be counteracted or at any rate modified by the preservation and planttion of forests and

Title Pages Author/Editor
Frontmatter i-xi P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter I Introductory 1-14 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter II the Physical Environment 15-36 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter III Population 37-59 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter IV Population 60-77 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter IV Population 78-90 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter VI the Income of British India 91-117 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter VII Social Institutions and Economic Life 118-139 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter VIII Social Institutions and Economic Life 140-162 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter IX Psychology and Economics 163-186 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter X Production 187-195 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XI Agriculture 196-227 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XII Low Agricultural Production 228-235 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XIII Subdivision and Fragmentation of Holdings 236-259 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XIV Tillage and Technique 260-277 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XV Agricultural Indebtedness 278-295 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XVI Agricultural Indebtedness 296-311 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XVII Agricultural Organisation 312-321 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XVIII Indian Industries 322-347 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XIX Factory Labour 348-383 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XX Industrial Capital 384-397 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XXI Business Enterprise 398-404 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Chapter XXII Cottage Industries 405-417 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Conclusion 418-420 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Index of Authors Cited 421-424 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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General Index 425-438 P.A. Wadia, G.N. Joshi

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Pages
449
SARF Document ID
sarf.146861

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