Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/32rxxw

The Briton in India

1935

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Summary

The one object of the book is to draw the attention of the English and Indians to the difficulties in the way of and the urgent need for the attainment of this racial equality. [...] but not of the Hindus." While the Hindu religious and social customs of the period thus precluded the possibility of an intimate association between the Europeans and the Hindus the outlook of the Mohammedans for different reasons partook of the same parochial nature. [...] Referring to the attitude of the ruling classes Gibbon says : "The policy of the Emperors and the Serrate as far as it concerned religion was happily seconded by the reflections of the enlightened and by the habits of the superstitious part of their subjects. [...] While the general result of the English contact with the Hindu and Mohammedan aristocracy was to bring about a better understanding between the two parties the fact that in the Presidency towns of Madras Cacutta and to some extent in Bombay they were thrown more into the society of the servile classes — the butler the gardener the "Hukkabardar." etc. [...] We contemplate with delight and surprise the admirer of Grecian bards and the pupil of the Grecian sages led by his enthusiasm from the banks of the Illyssus to the streams of the Ganges celebrating in strains not unworthy of Pindar the fabulous divinities of India and exploring the sources of the Egyptian and Persian theology and of the tenets of the Ionic and Italic schools of Philosophy

Title Pages Author/Editor
Preface i-xiv T.J. George

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Introduction 1-8 T.J. George

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Chapter I The situation at the beginning of English Connections with India in the Seventeenth and early Part of the Eighteenth Centuries 9-22 T.J. George

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Chapter II The State of Affairs during the Days of Warren Hastings 23-42 T.J. George

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Chapter III Lord Cornwallis: Lord Wellesley 43-69 T.J. George

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Chapter IV Influence of Women 70-92 T.J. George

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Chapter V Missionary Influence 93-116 T.J. George

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Chapter VI Influence of the Increase in Numbers: Military Adventurers—Suez Canal—Industrial Revolution 117-136 T.J. George

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Chapter VII Lord Bentick Educational Reforms: Macaulay’s Influence 137-162 T.J. George

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Chapter VIII Influence of Macaulay 163-185 T.J. George

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Chapter IX (The Indian Mutiny: Absence of a Middle Class: Pliant disposition of the “natives”) 186-220 T.J. George

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Chapter X Defects in the attitude of Superiority based on the Moral Argument 221-246 T.J. George

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Chapter XI Defects in the in moral Argument 247-308 T.J. George

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Chapter XII Defects in the Moral Argument 309-328 T.J. George

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Chapter XIII “Manifestations among the different Classes” 329-354 T.J. George

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Chapter XIV Manifestation of the Spirit among the different Classes 355-378 T.J. George

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Chapter XV Manifestation among the different Classes 379-414 T.J. George

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Chapter XVI Manifestation among the different Classes 415-448 T.J. George

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Chapter XVII Reaction on English Character 449-504 T.J. George

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Chapter XVIII Need for Adjustmeat 505-548 T.J. George

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Chapter XIX Need for Adjustment 549-620 T.J. George

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Chapter XX Need for Adjustment 621-668 T.J. George

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Chapter XXI Conclusion 669-690 T.J. George

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“The Briton in India”—Select Bibliogeaphy 691-702 T.J. George

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Pages
716
SARF Document ID
sarf.143827

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