Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/xhqzhk

Cassell’s Illustrated History of India

1890

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Summary

The first portion of our army crossed the Ganges on the 4th of February 1858 but the whole were not over until the 28th when the head-quarters were established at Buntara; but operations did not actually commence till the 2nd of March when Sir Colin starting in the grey dawn with the second division of infantry a strong force of artillery and cavalry marched eastward of the Alumbagh and men [...] course and then endeavour to penetrate westward and secure the command of two bridges one of iron and the other of stone which gave access to the city from the north the latter being opposite a street that lies between the Muchee Bhawn and the Great Imambara ; and hence he was to turn the works thus referred to by Sir Colin :— The series of courts and buildings called the Kaisebagh conside [...] The second line circled round the large building called the Mess House and the Motee Mahal ; and the first or interior one was the principal rampart of the Kaiserbagh the rear of the enclosures of the latter being closed in by the city through which approach would have been dangerous to an assailant. [...] Among the slain was the gallant Hodson the captor of the King of Delhi and young Moorsom of the sand one of the most promising officers in the service.* On the x gth the Moosabagh which was occupied by 7 000 of the rebels and was their last stronhold fell to the British. [...] It was unfortunate that by some mismanagment on the part of one of our commanders Sir Colin was deprived of the full fruit of his victory by the escape of the greater part of the mutineers with their leaders.* He invited the return of the fugitive inhabitants ; but it was ipossible to restrain the victorious and ' justly infuriated soldiers from the rich plunder of the great city of which

Title Pages Author/Editor
Frontmatter i-viii James Grant

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Chapter L. Maun Sing’s Proposal.—The March of Sir Colin Campbell.—Second Relief of Lucknow and Death of Havelock 301-305 James Grant

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Chapter LI. Mutinies at Mhow and Indore.—Murder of Sir Norman Leslie.—Battle of Cawnpore Won by Sir Colin Campbell General Franks Etc. 306-314 James Grant

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Chapter LII. Oude Entered—Lucknow Attacked and Taken—the Subsequent Campaign 314-320 James Grant

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Chapter LIII. The Campaign in Central India 320-326 James Grant

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Chapter LIV. The Government of India—A Proposed Change—the India Bill—Extinction of the Company—Proclamation of the Queen 326-333 James Grant

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Chapter LV. The Movements of Lord Clyde and Sir Hope Grant in Oude—The Escape of Bene Madhoo—The Durbar at Cawnpore—Amalgamation of the Forces 333-339 James Grant

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Chapter LVI. Third War with China 339-351 James Grant

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Chapter LVII. Fall of the Takoo Forts—Chan-Chai-Wan—Parkes and Others Taken—Pa-le-Chiao—Advance on Pekin—Summer Palace Taken —Fate of the Prisoners—Pekin Taken—Peace with China 351-362 James Grant

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Chapter LVIII. The Star of India—Lord Elgin Governor-General —Dies—Sir John Lawrence Succeeds—The War in Bhotan 362-369 James Grant

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Chapter LIX. End of the Contest in Bhotan—Famine in Orissa—Affairs of Mysore 370-375 James Grant

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Chapter LX. The Isles of British India 375-379 James Grant

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Chapter LXI. Earl of Mayo Viceroy—Shere Ali—The Revenue of India—The Feudatory Princes—The Lushai War 380-387 James Grant

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Chapter LXII. Lushai War—The Right Column Etc.—Lalboora Destroyed and Peace Enforced 387-394 James Grant

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Chapter LXIII. Lord Mayo’s Foreign Policy—Retrenchment—The Ex-King of Oude—Income Tax and Salt Duty—Railways 394-401 James Grant

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Chapter LXIV. Canals and Canal Cess—Education—Agriculture and Minerals 401-407 James Grant

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Chapter LXV. Prison Discipline—The White Pariahs—The Convict Colony—Assassination of Lord Mayo 408-415 James Grant

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Chapter LXVI. The interim-Viceroy—Lord Northbrook Viceroy—The Affair of Khiva—The Famine in Bengal and Behar 415-423 James Grant

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Chapter LXVII. The Hindoos of British India—Brief Resume of their Habits and Character 423-439 James Grant

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Chapter LXVIII. Of the Coolie System—Trial of the Guicowar of Baroda—Supposed Capture of Nana Sahib 440-446 James Grant

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Chapter LXIX. War with the Malays—Revolt of Ismail and Zela—Operations of the Troops—Defeat and Surrender of Ismail 446-453 James Grant

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Chapter LXX. The Nagas Expeditions—The Suez Canal 453-455 James Grant

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Chapter LXXI. Murder of Mr. Margary at Manwyne—Attack on Colonal Browne’s Mission—Correspondence Thereupon 455-461 James Grant

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Chapter LXXII. Russian Aggression in Central Asia—Annexation of Khokand—Departure of the Prince of Wales for India 461-466 James Grant

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Chapter LXXIII. Some Statistics of Indian Social Life in the Present Day 466-474 James Grant

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Chapter LXXIV. The Prince of Wales at Bombay Poonah Broda Ceylon and Trichinopoly 474-484 James Grant

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Chapter LXXV. The Prince of Wales at Madras and Calcutta 485-490 James Grant

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Chapter LXXVI. Resignation of Lord Northbrook—Artillery Experiments at Delhi—Poor Europeans in India—The Prince of Wales at Benares Etc. 490-497 James Grant

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Chapter LXXVII. The Prince of Wales at Agra Gwalior Jeypore and the Terai of Nepaul Etc. 497-507 James Grant

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Chapter LXXVIII. The Indian “Abstract ” 1873-74—Lord Napier Resigns the Command of the Army—Lord North-brook’s Administration 507-513 James Grant

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Chapter LXXIX. Lord Lytton Viceroy—The Kokat Pass—“The Royal Titles Bill”— The Queen Empress of India 513-518 James Grant

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Chapter LXXX. Our Indian Policy—Missions in China—Death of Sir James Weir Hogg Etc. 518-521 James Grant

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Chapter LXXXI. The Mohammedans of India on “The Eastern Question” 522-524 James Grant

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Chapter LXXXII. The Great Cyclone of 1876 525-530 James Grant

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Chapter LXXXIII. Progress of the Viceroy—The Indian Tea Trade—Navigation of the Oxus—The Nawab Nizam—Madras Affairs—Famine Threatened 530-537 James Grant

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Chapter LXXXIV. Infant Mortality in Calcutta—“The Model State.”—A Mack Ambassador—Story of Narandra Rao Bahadoor 537-543 James Grant

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Chapter LXXV. The Viceroy at Delhi 543-548 James Grant

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Chapter LXXVI. Proclamation of the Queen as Empress of India—Honours Conferred—The Durbar 548-555 James Grant

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Chapter LXXXVII. The Viceroy at Puttiala and Allyghur—The Afreedies—The Indian Famine of 1877 555-560 James Grant

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Chapter LXXXVIII. I The Jail Delivery—The North-Western Frontiers Etc.—Death of Jung Bahadoor 561-567 James Grant

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Chapter LXXXIX. Concluding Remarks 567-576 James Grant

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General Index 577-588 James Grant

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history

Pages
326
SARF Document ID
sarf.145209

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