Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/xb0gnt

Indian Unrest

1910

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Summary

The fact that Poona is one focus of sedition has been attributed in this volume to the survival among the Maratha Brahmins of the recollection that far into the eighteenth century.Poona was the capital of a theocratic State in which behind the Throne of the Peshwas both spiritual and secular authority were concentrated in the hands of the Brahmins.'? [...] That does not put an end to the administration but it creates endless complications in the work of adminstration and if these complications are created in every part of the country the administration will have been brought to a deadlock and made none the less impossible for the primary thing is the prestige of the Government and the boycott strikes at the root of that prestige. [...] These will suffice to show what the freedom of the Press stood for in India in a country where there is an almost superstitious reverence for and faith in the printed word where the influence of the Press is in proportion to the ignorance of the vast majority of its readers. [...] The fashion of the day is for religious revivals " in which the worship of Kali the sanguinary goddess of destrution or the cult of Shivaji-Maharaj the Mahratta chietain who humbled in his day the pride of the alien coquerors of Hindustan plays an appropriately conspicuous part. [...] With the development of the great administrative sevices with the substitution of English for the verncular tongues as the only official language with the rmodelling of judicial administration and procedure on British lines with the growth of the liberal professions and of the Press their influence constantly found new fields of activity whilst through the old traditional channels it

Title Pages Author/Editor
Frontmatter i-xvi Valentine Chirol

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Chapter I. A General Survey 1-7 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter II. Swaraj on the Platform and in the Press 8-23 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter III. A Hindu Revival 24-36 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter IV. Brahmanism and Disaffection in the Deccan 37-63 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter V. Poona and Kolhapur 64-71 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter VI. Bengal Before the Partition 72-80 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter VII. The Storm in Bengal 81-105 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter VIII. The Punjab and the Arya Samaj 106-117 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter IX. The Position of the Mahomedans 118-135 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter X. Southern India 136-144 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XI. Revolutionary Organizations Outside India 145-153 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XII. The Indian National Congress 154-161 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XIII. Constitutional Reforms 162-175 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XIV. The Depressed Castes 176-184 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XV. The Native States 185-197 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XVI. Cross-Currents 198-206 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XVII. The Growth of Western Education 207-215 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XVIII. The Indian Student 216-228 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XIX. Some Measures of Educational Reform 229-237 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XX. The Question of Religious Education 238-245 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XXI. Primary Education 246-253 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XXII. Swadeshi and Economic Progress 254-270 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XXIII. The Financial and Fiscal Relations Between India and Great Britain 271-279 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XXIV. The Position of Indians in the Empire 280-287 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XXV. Social and Official Relations 288-305 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XXVI. The Government of India 306-318 Valentine Chirol

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Chapter XVII. Conclusions 319-334 Valentine Chirol

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Notes 335-360 Valentine Chirol

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Index 361-371 Valentine Chirol

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Pages
387
SARF Document ID
sarf.144306

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