Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/v4v7h8

A Review of Hyderabad Finance

1951

Premium

Summary

H. the Nizam's Government; (2) gold or silver coins of the British Government; and (3) the sum expended in the purchase of gold or silver bullion and securities which are for the time being held by the Assistant Minister Finance as a reserve to provide for the satisfaction and discharge of the said notes; and the said notes shall be deemed to have been issued on the credit of the Government as [...] The currency notes of Hyderabad were popular with the public as may be seen from the rapid circulation of the notes even in the villages of the State. [...] This was due to the insufficient supply of H. S. rupee coins the habit of hoarding rupees by the public and the tightness of the money market in India then combined with the slackness of the export trade of the State. [...] With the outbreak of the World War I (1914-1918) the question of the rate of exchange between the O. S. and the Indian rupee engaged the serious attention of Government. [...] The rule of the Bahmanis and later the division and diintegration of the Deccan under the Imad Shahs of Berar the Nizam Shahs of Ahmednagar the Barid Shahs of Bidar the Adil Shahs of Bijapur and the Qutub Shahs of Golconda followed.

Title Pages Author/Editor
Cover i-ii unknown

View

Frontmatter i-viii unknown

View

Introduction ix-x C. V. S. Rao

View

Preface xi-xii S. Iyengar

View

Chapter I The Currency System (Coinage Note Issue Exchange) 1-16 unknown

View

Chapter II Hyderabad’s Finances before Sir Salar Jung I 17-22 unknown

View

Chapter III Reforms of Sir Salar Jung I and the Financial Relations of Hyderabad with the Government of India during the Latter Half of the 19th Century 23-30 unknown

View

Chapter IV Financial Developments after Sir Salab Jung 31-45 unknown

View

Chapter V Financial Reorganization by Sir Akbar Hydari-Reclassification of Heads of Revenue and Expenditure— Earmarking of Special Reserves—Department Alization of Finance (1921-1948) 46-i unknown

View

Chapter VI The Purchase of the Railway 91-100 unknown

View

Chapter VII The Round Table Conferences the Parliamentary Joint Committee and the Government of India Act 1935 101-102 unknown

View

Chapter VIII The Second World War and after (1939-1946) 103-124 unknown

View

Chapter IX The Interlude between the Independence of India and the Police Action on Hyderabad (August 1947 to September 1948) 125-128 unknown

View

Chapter X Main Heads of Revenue: Land Revenue; Forests; Customs; Abkari or Excise; Stamps; Registration; Mines; Petrol Cess; Motor Vehicles Tax 129-154 unknown

View

Chapter XI Main Heads of Revenue (contd.) : Post; Railways; Electricity; Income tax; Business Profits Tax; Selective Sales Tax; Berar Rent 155-177 unknown

View

Chapter XII Main Heads of Revenue (Contd.) : Central Excise Duties 178-184 unknown

View

Chapter XIII Main Heads of Expenditure 185-208 unknown

View

Chapter XIV Main Heads of Expenditure (Contd.) Nation-building Departments 209-251 unknown

View

Chapter XV A Review of Capital Outlay 252-255 unknown

View

Chapter XVI Investment of Surpluses—Reserves 256-278 unknown

View

Chapter XVII Assets and Liabilities: The Public Debt 279-285 unknown

View

Chapter XVIII The Structure of Taxation: A Few Comparisons with Adjacent States 286-294 unknown

View

Chapter XIX The Incidence and Direction of Government Expenditure 295-301 unknown

View

Chapter XX Accounts and Audit: Financial Statistics 302-305 unknown

View

Chapter XXI Economic Planning 306-321 unknown

View

Chapter XXII The Hyderabad State Bank 322-333 unknown

View

Chapter XXIII Local Finance 334-342 unknown

View

Chapter XXIV Financial Reforms of the Military Government of Hyderabad 343-360 unknown

View

Chapter XXV Hyderabad Economics after the “ Police Action.” 361-370 unknown

View

Chapter XXVI The Future of Hyderabad Finances 371-375 unknown

View

Tags

government politics public policy

Pages
424
SARF Document ID
sarf.145856