Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/r8m9sc

The Indian Constitution. an Introductory Study

1913

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Summary

The results of the Mahratta wars of the Pindari and the Afghan wars and of the Sikh and Burmese wars are of importance to the student of the Constitution only for the purpose of understanding how the Company and the Crown adjusted the mechanism of adminitration to the growing needs of the enormous increase in the territories which thereby came under their sway. [...] The growth of legislative administrative and judicial authority in the few settlements of the Company in India is closely affeced by the amount of interest which successive Stuart Kings could be induced to take in the affairs of the Company and it was more the prerogative of the King combined with the eterprise of the merchants than the interest of the British Nation22 THE INDIAN CONSTITU [...] The rapid acquisition of territories on behalf of the Copany in India in the subsequent period and the equally rapid acquisition of enormous wealth by all manner of means by the servants of the Company combined with the extremely unsatifactory state of the affairs of the Company itself in London and of the government of the people in its territories in the East attracted pointed Parliamenta [...] The interpretation put upon it at the time and what was probably the intention of Parliment was the Government of India was to have the right of initiative; the Council in London the right of revision and the Secretary of State subject to the ultimate judgment of the House of Commons the right of veto. [...] George Yule pointed out in the speech quoted in the Note to the last Chapter that the Government of India was to have the right of initiative the Council in London the right of revision pnq the Secretary of Stabe the right of veto subject to the ultimate judgment of the House of Commons.

Tags

government politics public policy

Pages
498
SARF Document ID
sarf.142254