Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/1pkm35

Indian Citizen Services. The Cooperative Movement in India

1917

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Summary

Credit is the simplest form of co-operation and it was necessary to familiarise the people with the principles of coperation through the most simple form when they had lost all ideas of associated action chiefly owing to the failure of early English legislators to understand the economic and social structure of the country resulting in the substituting of a regime of economic individualism for [...] Before describing the origin and development of co-operation in India we would attempt to give here a brief survey of the growth of the co-operative movement in some of the chief countries of the world. [...] The essential features of the Raiffeisen rural bank.— Before describing the essential features of the Raiffeisen system we should have a full grasp of the meaning of personal credit which lies at the basis of the Raiffeisen system. [...] In a society with unlimited liability the members over and above the liability to pay in full the nominal value of the obligatory single share—for only one share may be taken by each member—undertake liability for the engagements of the society to its creditors directly to the extent of the whole of their property ; and this liability is individual and collective. [...] The committee and the board are in the first instance legally responsible to the society to the full extent of their property when losses occur as the result of their not exercising the prudence of ordinary business men" in the affairs of the society ; and finally there is the further safeguard of the audit which must be carried out at least oncwithin every two years.

Title Pages Author/Editor
Preface i-xxi Panchanandas Mokherji

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Chapter I. A Brief Survey of the Origin and Development of Co-Operation 1-20 unknown

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Chapter II. Recent Developments of Co-Operation in The West 21-55 unknown

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Chapter III. Rural Indebtedness in India 56-60 unknown

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Chapter IV. Preliminary Experiments 61-66 unknown

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Chapter V. The Co-Operative Credit Societies Act of 1904 67-72 unknown

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Chapter VI. Progress of Co-Operation in India Since 1904: The Passing of the Co-Operative Societies Act 1912 73-78 unknown

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Chapter VII. Agricultural Credit Co-Operative Societies 79-98 unknown

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Chapter VIII. Co-Operative Grain Banks or Dharmagolas 99-113 unknown

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Chapter IX. Obstacles in The Way of Rural Co-Operation in India 114-119 unknown

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Chapter X. Effects of the Rural Credit Co-Operative Movement in India 120-128 unknown

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Chapter XI. Non-Agricultural Credit Co-Operative Societies 129-157 unknown

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Chapter XII. Agricultural Non-Credit Co-Operative Societies 158-229 unknown

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Chapter XIII. Co-Operation and Agriculture 230-235 unknown

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Chapter XIV. Non-Agricultural Non-Credit Co-Operative Societies 236-287 unknown

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Chapter XV. Guaranteeing Unions in Burma 288-297 unknown

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Chapter XVI. Higher Co-Operative Financing Agencies: Central Co-Operative Banks 298-306 unknown

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Chapter XVII.Higher Co-Operative Financing Agencies: Provincial Co-Operative Banks 307-321 unknown

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Chapter XVIII.Non-Co-Operative Agricultural Banks Vs. Co-Operative Credit Institutions 322-337 unknown

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Chapter XIX. Co-Operation and Public Aid 338-347 unknown

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Chapter XX. The Law of Co-Operation in India: The Co-Operative Societies Act: Act No. II of 1912 348-392 unknown

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Chapter XXI.Conclusion 393-453 unknown

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Index i-viii unknown

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Indian Citizen Series i-viii unknown

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Pages
490
SARF Document ID
sarf.142146

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