Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/xtbrbc

Industrial and News Edition of the Journal of the Indian Chemical Society

1950

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Summary

The overall extraction coefficient Ka was calculated on the basis of the phase P which offered the major resistance to solute transfer compared to the water phase W. Taking for instance the system benzene-acetone-water the log mean driving force was based on CB I and CO and on the equilibrium concentration in the benzene phase corresponding to the observed concentration in the water phase. [...] The rate of extraction could be calculated from the rate of flow of the solvent and solution and from the change in the concentration of water or of the solvent phase. [...] Elgin and Browning5 and Appel and Elgin2 found in the case of spray and packed columns that with the increase in the flow rate of the dispersed phase there was an increase in the hold-up but with increase in the continuous phase flow rate the hold-up values remained more or less constant. [...] The relationship as found above between the flow rate of the dispersed and continuous phase with the extraction coefficient was not corroborated by Johnson and Bliss" Bergelin et al.3 and Comings and Briggs4 who came to the conclusion that the flow rate of the dispersed phase had considerable effect on the coefficient but that of the continuous phase also had a smaller effect on the coefficien [...] The increase in the values of the extraction coefficient with increase in the flow rate of the dispersed phase is due to a greater agitation and also due to an increase in the number of drops and hence in the specific contact area 'a'.

Title Pages Author/Editor
Frontmatter i-ii R. Chatterjee, B.K. Mukherjee

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Liquid-Liquid Extracion in Perforated Plate Column. Part I. Effect of Flow Rate and Concentration 93-102 S.K. Nandi, S.K. Ghosh

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Liquid-Liquid Extraction in Perforated Plate Column. Part II. Effect of Area and Size of Holes 103-107 S.K. Ghosh, S.K. Nandi

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Liquid-Liquid Extraction in Perforated Plate Column. Part III. Plate Efficiency and Effect of Plate Spacing 108-114 S.K. Ghosh, S.K. Nandi

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Studies in the Bleaching of Jute. Part II. Action of Common Bleaching Agents 115-128 W.G. Macmillan, A.B. Gupta, S.K. Majumdar

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Studies in the Autoxidative Rancidity of Edible Oils. Part I 129-137 S.A. Saletore, N.H. Harkare

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Colorimetric Determination of Total Lead in Paint Materials 138-146 G. Narsimhan, S.A. Saletore

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Studies in Colloidal Graphite. Part II. Preparation of Colloidal Graphite in Mineral Oil 147-149 K.K. Majumdar

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Manufacture of Taurine 150-156 M.V. Vakilwalla, D.M. Trivedi

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Studies on the Lignites of South India. Part I. Analysis and Calorific Value of Lignite from South Arcot 157-158 B.S. Srikantan

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Modification of Cane Molasses. Part II 159-162 B.K. Mukherji

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Lubricating Properties of Vegetable Oils. Part I A Comparative Study of Domba Oil Hongay Oil and Mohua Oil 163-166 V. Thiagarajan, B.S. Srikantan

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Structure of Compounds in Relation to their Antimalarial Activity 167-170 U.P. Basu

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A Comparative Study of B. O. D. Values of Sewage with that Obtained by Chemical Oxidation 171-175 S.C. Chakravarti, A.B. Som

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Studies in the Oxidation of Indigo for the Preparation of Isatin 176-178 Srish Saha

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Technical Research Notes 179-180 unknown

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Notes & News 181-188 unknown

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Reviews 189-191 unknown

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Indian Patents 192-200 unknown

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Backmatter i-ii unknown

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Tags

technology medicine science

Pages
112
SARF Document ID
sarf.120038

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